Skip to content
November 6, 2014 / Sian Moore

WERU seminar series: what does the Workplace Employment Relations Study (WERS) survey tell us about collective bargaining in the UK?

This seminar brings together three expert speakers to discuss the picture of collective bargaining portrayed in the recent WERS. Our emphasis will be on the survey methodology used and the comparative picture of employment relations available from other sources and methodologies.

Our expert speakers are:
Alex Bryson (NIESR), who will look at what WERS tells us about the decline in coverage of collective bargaining in the private sector of the UK economy. He will focus on what the 2004 and 2011 surveys say about pay bargaining and other terms and conditions of employment.
Alastair Hatchett (University of Greenwich), who has 30 years experience as Head of IDS Pay Services monitoring pay bargaining in large companies in the private sector and the whole of the public sector, will talk about the resilience of collective bargaining in large organisations in a range of industrial sectors and look at the reasons for weak trade union presence in other sectors.
Dr Andrew Timming (University of St Andrews), will present what he considers to be the top 10 ‘best practices’ for the design of questionnaires. For each practice he will illustrate where the WERS survey instruments meet the standards of good survey design and, crucially, where he thinks they fall short.

Wednesday 26 November at 13.00-16.00, University of Greenwich Business School, Room QA175, Queen Anne Court, Old Royal Naval College, Park Row, Greenwich, London SE10 9LS.

This seminar is open to the public. To RSVP please contact Professor Geoffrey White at  G.K.White@greenwich.ac.uk.

Click here for more information

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: